Posted by on Aug 7, 2016 in (in)courage, Encouragement, Faith, Uncategorized | 1 comment

An encouragement for incourage.
 
20160807-SundayScripture-Eph6

We would do well to always remember two things:

 

There is a lover of our soul who…

is always for us {Romans 8:31}, with us {Isaiah 43:5}, and on our side {Psalm 118:6}. He is father and friend {Psalm 103:131 John 3:1 and John 15:13}, willing to help {Isaiah 41:13} and heal {Psalm 147:3}, eager to save {John 3:36Romans 10:13}. To him, we are precious {Isaiah 43:4}, so much so, he sacrificed his life for me {John 3:16}. For us.

and . . .

There is an enemy of our soul who…

seeks to kill and steal and destroy {John 10:10}. He is roaring lion on blood-thirsty prowl and he will devour you {1 John 3:8}. This one is master of disguise {2 Corinthians 11:14}, a dragon {Revelation 12:9}, and a schemer {Ephesians 6:11}; accusing {Revelation 12:10}, oppressive {Acts 10:38} and divisive {Luke 11:18}.

 

While it’s impossible for me to know your circumstances, it’s a safe bet there is some tension in your life pitting rocks against hard places.

 

So often — too often — relational tensions arise between people who matter to us. Whether colleague or companion, family or friend, issues can arise with potentially devastating consequences.

What begins as a simple misunderstanding between two people can dismantle a friendship . . .

Distrust can creep in when a co-worker oversteps boundaries or capitalizes on your ideas . . .

One child’s poor decision can wreak havoc on the entire family . . .

A spouse’s infidelity can shatter a marriage . . .

It’s so easy to focus on how we’re hurt in the process. Pain demands attention.

In nature, pain is a good thing. It can signal a course of correction that keeps us safe. Alive even. If you’re swimming and under water too long, you don’t even have to think about it — your body fights its way to the surface so your lungs can replenish oxygen. Heat from a campfire reminds you to keep a safe distance to avoid getting burned.
 
In life, relational fractures and its accompanying pain can orient a self-focus: when we’re angry, hurt, or embarrassed; when we feel rejected, ignored, or marginalized.

But . . . when we’re governed by our feelings we can forget we’re at war….

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